Static Zine

//A collective Toronto arts and lifestyle zine//

Get to know a Static contributor: Ricky Lam

Static’s second issue, First Times in Toronto, is out October 22nd. So to celebrate, over the month, you’ll get to know the contributors of the issue through some of their first times in Toronto.


Ricky Lam, the ninth tallest Asian on earth, will make his Static debut in issue 2 in a real meta way. Before we let him infiltrate our world, he was just a senior software developer, founder/editor of The Panic Manual, concert festival world traveler, slick DJ with funky dance moves and lover of world peace. But now, his life is going to be that much more full of static cling. Good luck, Lam!

First concert in Toronto was Echo and the Bunnymen, 2003, Palais Royale. Ventured to The Palais Royale on a weeknight for this show despite the fact that I lived at Yonge and Finch at the time. I think it took me four or seven hours to get home by TTC from there, but it was completely worth it. Also, the last time I have been to Palais Royale.

First job was found using my friend’s U of T account to access their career site. When I was asked during the interview how I found the job since it was only posted on the U of T site, I told them I used my friends account. I think they liked that. Cheat to win baby, (but it’s not really cheating).

First outdoor concert in Toronto was Curiosa - The Cure, Muse, Interpol, Rapture @ Molson Amphitheatre, It’s always interesting to see the Cure play an outdoor show in August just because of the inevitable goth makeup meltdown from some of the Cure fans who decided dressing up for a Cure show in the middle of summer was a good idea. Muse was certainly a highlight, and played in front of maybe 200 people. That, as we know, would soon change.

First trip out of Toronto (after moving here, besides going to Edmonton) was Coachella 2004! Radiohead, The Cure, Belle and Sebastian, kraftwerk, Flaming Lips, Basement Jaxx, Pixies, Beck, Air, Muse..pretty much the best Coachella lineup ever. The first trip I paid for with my own hard earned money would be a good indicator of my musical tourist type of vacations in the years to come.

First time I felt like Toronto was home was when I flew back to Edmonton and realized that I was more Toronto and less Edmonton, by that, I mean, I cut off people when I walk and jay walked relentlessly.

First in-store was Gruff Rhys of Super Furry Animals in Soundscapes. It was absolutely packed in there and two of my friends left because of the heat, I also learned how to take the streetcar for the first time that day.

If I had a last day in Toronto, I would eat multiple meals, go to the island, chill in kensington, go to dance cave, go to chinatown, base jump off the CN tower..in that order.

Get to know a Static contributor: Aviva Cohen

Static’s second issue, First Times in Toronto, is out October 22nd. So to celebrate, over the month, you’ll get to know the contributors of the issue through some of their first times in Toronto.



As managing editor, Aviva works with Jessica and Melody running the zine with tasks such as idea generation, curating the mixtapes and events and managing the contributors. For issue 1, she wrote about napping at concerts, which snagged us a sweet excerpt page in Broken Pencil. For issue 2, she’s covered a more sombre topic. She’s known to actually nap at concerts around the city, but she’s currently interning in government corporate communications, which is quite like Parks & Recreation. To our best knowledge, Aviva is still alive.

First time I felt like Toronto was home was when i stopped having to carry around a crumpled black & white map to get around. It left my pocket free for other important things like 7-11 gummi candies and phone numbers (ok, just 7-11 gummies).

First job was working downtown at my mother’s law firm. On our way home we would pass by sneaky dee’s and my mother told me that’s where all the punks hung out.

First favorite neighborhood was Roncesvalles. I spent the twilight of my youth at the Intersteer. Thirty hearty cheers, a thundering of tears.

First concert was probably something bad like hot hot heat. i was 17, we all make mistakes. my first favorite concert were my boys, The Constantines at the Phoenix with Lullabye Arkestra. at the end of the show i jumped on stage and sang Lou Reed’s ‘Temporary Thing.’

First outdoor concert was SARSstock. remember SARS?

First bar/club i went to was Club Rockit for one of Eric Warner’s shows. Im being nostalgic - This venue no longer exists, look it up, it was in Scott Pilgrim. Also cut your hair and get off my lawn.

First record store i visited was Soundscapes for an Iron & Wine instore.

First time I got lost was on the way to said instore.

First celeb sighting was not in Toronto. I passed by Jackie Mason in NYC. Jackie Mason, guys! #jewish

First heartbreak made me a Ryan Adams fan.

First favorite book was The Great Gatsby.

First New Year’s was spent with The Sadies for their 50 hour annual NYE at the Horseshoe. I would spend the evening on my pals couch with her dog, the only woman who really loved me.

First Valentine’s Day……not alone, being sad listening to final fantasy on repeat? We made fancy gnocchi and i brought flowers. I ended up at the Tranzac by myself for $100. Lonesome & country music, that sounds about right.

First trip out of Toronto you could see, Lake Erie, Niagara Falls.  from the top of the mountain, i could see farther than anyone. driving through the line, we pretend we are from Africa, if we fall far behind, i am brave, i am brave…..oh wait, my life is not a Sufjan Stevens bonus track included on a double vinyl release. really, it was probably to Montreal. i bet we stopped by The Big Apple on the way.

If I had a last day in Toronto, I would eat at all my favorite joints, throw up on queen street and pass out in the park till someone stabed me. Nobody leaves Toronto alive.

Get to know a Static contributor: Melody Lamb

Static’s second issue, First Times in Toronto, is out October 22nd. So to celebrate, over the month, you’ll get to know the contributors of the issue through some of their first times in Toronto.


Melody Lamb is one of the managing editors of Static. She wrote two articles for the first issue, one on the kinds of people you’d find in record stores and one on why there should be more food available around the clock. For the second issue, she’ll tackle something much darker. Melody helps run the zine with Jessica and Aviva, such as with idea generation, curating the mixtapes and events and managing the contributors. Melody is currently in her last year of university and has a steady schedule of music journalism for many web outlets such as Spinner and The Line of Best Fit.

First time I felt like Toronto was home was when I figured out the proximity between my grandmother’s apartment and the Eaton Centre. They were practically down the street from each other but it wasn’t till I started coming downtown myself that I made that connection; I always thought the two were miles apart!

First job was cashier at the Yonge-Eglinton Indigo - two floors of books and awesome. 

First apartment was near Bloor, between Jarvis and Sherbourne. If I can survive that part of downtown Toronto, I can survive (almost) anything.

First favourite neighborhood was — Technically, I will forever be a North Yorker. I heart NY.

First concert was The Strokes at Ricoh Colliseum, 2006!

First bar/club I went to — Of course, the Horseshoe. Gotta do it right.

First outdoor concert was some show at Harbourfront. My favourite outdoor venue - the only logical step up is to actually have bands perform on boats and for us to watch from there.

First record store was Criminal Records. (Cue Whitney Houston’s “I Will Always Love You”) 

First in-store was Mother Mother @ Criminal Records.

First favorite book was Rainbow Fish. But my first REAL favourite book was Nick Hornby’s High Fidelity.

First library was Fairview Public Library. Got lost in there once, when I was four, and I cried for an hour. The place was only two floors.

First celebrity sighting was some MuchMusic VJ outside of MuchMusic. Those were, unfortunately, what I considered celebrities back in the day.

First kiss was Jake Ford, eighth grade, by my locker after school. I told him my friend dared me to do it when in reality I just wanted to do it.

First heartbreak was on the subway, during rush hour. Yes, break ups like that exist.

First New Year’s was technically, the first New Year’s that wasn’t spent at home or with family was with friends at the Tranzac. Great bands, great night and a regretful decision to have McDonald’s as my first meal of the year. Perfect.

First Valentine’s Day — Baked my boyfriend a heart-shaped cookie, canceled our trip to the Science Centre, ate dinner at the Rivoli later that night then got into a fight and watched Slumdog Millionaire in the theatre without saying a word to each other. This pretty much sums up the trajectory of all my relationships.

First trip out of Toronto was (without family) Montreal! Poutine, Osheaga, more poutine.

First time I got lost was — I don’t remember. I got lost quite often and it wasn’t till a friend pointed out that the city ran on a grid that I finally learned how to get around Toronto.

If I had a last day in Toronto, I would hang out in Kensington Market, stroll around the city, maybe take a trip up the CN Tower (to take a look at the city one last time), spend the night having food adventures in the Annex, catch a show at the Horseshoe - hopefully a good band! - and end it with nachos at Sneaky Dee’s. No one leaves Toronto without the taste of those nachos in their mouth.

Get to know a Static contributor: Jessica Lewis

Static’s second issue, First Times in Toronto, is out October 22nd. So to celebrate, over the month, you’ll get to know the contributors of the issue through some of their first times in Toronto. Let’s start with…

Jessica Lewis doesn’t exactly write for Static just yet, but she runs it. As editor, she works with her co-eds, Melody and Aviva, on everything including the mixtape and events, manages the contributors’ stories and art, edits, runs the websites and much more. She also works at the University of Toronto, blogs and writes for other various music websites such as AUX and Dork Shelf. Here, learn about how the Buffalo, NY-expat settled in, and know that her music taste is much better now.

First time I felt like Toronto was home was in 2005 when I visited the city to see if I wanted to go to Ryerson University. I did. I knew that this is where I belonged.

First job was a reporter at the school paper, The Eyeopener.

First house was
a complete dump in the east end.

First favourite neighbourhood was
around school, Yonge and Dundas, as that was the ‘neighbourhood’ I knew best first. I had a lot to learn.

First concert was
Islands at the Opera House. Or if we’re getting technical, Hanson at the Molson Amphitheatre many many moons ago when I even made a sign to wave around.

First outdoor concert probably something at Dundas Square, if not, it was when Mobile, The New Pornographers and Tokyo Police Club all played at City Hall one chilly February. (Or, technical answer, Hanson.)

First record store I visited was Criminal Records (RIP!).

First in-store was that same time at Criminal, I went with a friend to see Moneen.

First celebrity sighting was
at TIFF, I think Brittany Murphy (RIP!), but I vividly remember Beck, outside the Edge studios another time two months later. Saw a limo, didn’t realize it was him, went to the bank, walked back, a woman yelled “BECK!” and I walked in and watched the entire interview.

First kiss was in a dorm room.

First heartbreak was
long, but with that sullen stomach feeling of knowing it was right.

First New Year’s was right before the first time I was to really leave Toronto, London-bound for a semester abroad. It was full of tears, because I knew I’d really miss all these people who ended up not being my friends by the time I was back.

First time I went to the islands was with family and some friends when I went to check out the city for school. It became my favourite place here instantly. The idea of an island right off the city was weird and exciting to me, the city’s own little oasis.

First trip out of Toronto was Ottawa to visit a former roommate, not counting all my trips home to Buffalo.

First time I got lost was probably very early, sometime in Frosh Week. I remember feeling completely disoriented during the city version of capture the flag one night. But I also remember everyone telling me I took to the city quickly.

If I had a last day in Toronto, I would stroll the Annex, Kensington, go to the islands, finally take a trip up the CN tower, sit on my stoop and people-watch, hopefully catch a show at Lee’s. And then pass out from exhaustion.

"Don’t Look at Me!"

Here’s a poem about Toronto from Issue #2 contributor Anthony Damiao.

If you’re ever

In Toronto

And you see me

At the crosswalk

Try to appreciate

The beauty of that

Crumbling pawn shop,

The gasoline flash

Of a pidgeon’s wings

Do your best

To take in the skyscrapers

Or do your part,

And pick up that can

You’ve been kicking since Bloor

Because,

It’s a busy city

There’s so much to observe

Besides,

I’ve forgotten

Your name again

It’s an elephant

I’d hate to walk around

I’d rather we avoid that room

Altogether

First Dates in Toronto

As you know, our second issue is themed “first times in Toronto.” We’re putting together a centre spread on first dates in the city, and we want to hear your stories!

Send them to us in a couple sentences on Facebook, Twitter or in an email. Can’t wait to hear em.

Sonic Doom

The Ex is finally over, hallelujah, but they of course ended with the sonic torture that is the air show. Yahlehly reflects as-it-happened this past weekend:

crossing the street by drake patio when out of nowhere an incredible thunder PIERCES the atmosphere & sends vibrations through the air

diners, pedestrians, both outdoors & in, throw up their arms or duck to shield themselves from sudden unknown dangers

i stop mid-crosswalk, hunch & plug my ears—i’d be useless under attack, apparently

as the moment passes we collectively realize we’re in no immediate danger & that the sound did not emit from a bomb or explosion

but from a show ‘plane (likely the hornet or thunderbolt) probably meant to mark the kickoff of the CNE airshow

people don’t laugh at themselves, nor are we impressed, the collective feeling is grim
 

i keep trying but fail to describe it

my heart thought it died


three blocks later…

while watching a less threatening red bi-plane perform stunts off in the smoggy distance

guy: did you hear that ‘plane earlier? i thought the world was gonna end

me: yeah. it. did. not. feel. good. 

attempts at breaking the sound barrier over downtown toronto should be illegal


 

*to my dad who adores airshows & who is probably laughing at my apparent cowardice

understand, this was not an ordinary show ‘plane sound, not like the ones that startle me awake this time each year

those i’ve sort of gotten used to, sort of

i thought i felt terror before but this was wholly different
it was a singular boom & vibration that for an instant felt truly like the end of my world

bad bad vibes

 

i blame it for all the melancholy i’ve felt since

Check out this beautiful shot of Lowell Sostomi of Great Bloomers from  our launch party back in June at Sky Blue Sky! Many thanks to Julie  Lavelle.

Check out this beautiful shot of Lowell Sostomi of Great Bloomers from our launch party back in June at Sky Blue Sky! Many thanks to Julie Lavelle.

Danger due to Art (or Fart)

Danger due to Art (or Fart)